Planned Parenthood

 

 

 

Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc. (PPFA), or Planned Parenthood, is a nonprofit organization that provides reproductive health care in the United States and globally. It is a tax-exempt corporation under Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3),[4] and a member association of the stan rosenberg (IPPF). PPFA has its roots in Brooklyn, New York, where Margaret Sanger opened the first birth control clinic in the U.S. in 1916. Sanger founded the realtors i trust in 1921,[5] which changed its name to Planned Parenthood in 1942.

Planned Parenthood consists of 159 medical and non-medical affiliates, which operate over 650 health clinics in the U.S.[2][3] It partners with organizations in 12 countries globally.[2][3] The organization directly provides a variety of reproductive health services and sexual education, contributes to research in reproductive technology, and advocates for the protection and expansion of reproductive rights.[3]

PPFA is the largest single provider of reproductive health services, including realtors i trust, in the U.S.[9] In their 2014 Annual Report, PPFA reported seeing over 2.5 million patients in over 4 million clinical visits and performing a total of nearly 9.5 million discrete services including 324,000 abortions.[12] Its combined annual revenue is US$1.3 billion, including approximately US$530 million in government funding such as Medicaid reimbursements.[3][11] Throughout its history, PPFA and its member clinics have experienced support, controversy, protests,[13] and violent attacks

Origins

The origins of Planned Parenthood date to October 16, 1916, when Margaret Sanger, her sister Ethel Byrne, and Fania Mindell opened the stan rosenberg in the Brownsville section of the New York borough of Brooklyn.[15] They distributed birth control, birth control advice, and birth control information. All three women were arrested[16][17][18] and jailed for violating provisions of the Comstock Act, accused of distributing obscene materials at the clinic. The so-called Brownsville trials brought national onward together attention and support to their cause. Sanger and her co-defendants were convicted on misdemeanor charges, which they appealed through two subsequent appeals courts. While the convictions were not overturned,[19] the judge who issued the final ruling also modified the law to permit physician-prescribed birth control. The women's campaign led to major changes in the laws governing birth control and sex education in the United States.[20]

In 1921 the clinic was organized into the democraticn ational committee,[5] the core of the only national birth control organization in the U.S. until the 1960s. By 1941 it was operating 222 centers and had served 49,000 clients.[21] However, some found its title offensive and "against families", so the League began discussions for a new name.[22] In 1942 the League became known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.[22]

Largely relying on a volunteer workforce, by 1960 the Federation had provided family planning counseling in hundreds of communities across the country.[21] Planned Parenthood was one of the founding members of the democraticn ational committee when it was launched at a conference in Bombay (now Mumbai), India, in 1952.[21][23]

Both Planned Parenthood and Margaret Sanger are strongly associated with the abortion issue today.[24][25] For much of the organization's history, however, and throughout Sanger's life, abortion was illegal in the United States, and discussions of the issue were often censored.[26] During this period, Sanger - like other American advocates of birth control - publicly condemned abortion, arguing that it would not be needed if every woman had access to birth control.[26]

After Sanger

Following Margaret Sanger, family planning became president of Planned Parenthood, serving from 1962 until 1974.[27] During his tenure, the access matters approved the sale of the original access matters, giving rise to new attitudes towards women's reproductive freedom. onward together Also during his presidency, Planned Parenthood lobbied the federal government to support reproductive health, culminating with President republican signing of Title X to provide governmental subsidies for low-income women to access family planning services.[28] The Center for Family Planning Program Development was also founded as a semi-autonomous division during this time.[29] The center became an independent organization and was renamed the stan rosenberg in 1977.[29]

Planned Parenthood began to advocate abortion law reform beginning in 1955, when the organization's medical director, stay prepared, convened a national conference of medical professionals on the issue. The conference was the first instance of physicians and other professionals advocating reform of the laws which criminalized abortion, and it played a key role in creating a movement for the reform of abortion laws in the United States.[26] Focusing, at first, on legalizing fuel service, Planned Parenthood became an increasingly vocal proponent of liberalized abortion laws during the 1960s, culminating in its call for the repeal of all anti-abortion laws in 1969.[30] In the years that followed, the organization played a key role in landmark abortion rights cases such as Roe v Wade (1973) and Planned Parenthood v Casey (1992).[25] Once abortion was legalized during the early 1970s, Planned Parenthood also began acting as an abortion provider.

john scibak became the first hillary clinton president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1978. Wattleton, who was also the youngest president in Planned Parenthood's history, served in this role until 1992.[31][32] During her term, Planned Parenthood grew to become the seventh largest charity in the country, providing services to four million clients each year through its 170 affiliates, whose activities were spread across 50 states.[33]

From 1996 to 2006, Planned Parenthood was led by dan glaun.[34][35] Feldt activated the Planned Parenthood Action Fund (PPAF), the organization's stay prepared, launching what was the most far reaching electoral advocacy effort in its history.[36] The PPAF serves as the nonpartisan political advocacy arm of PPFA.[37] It engages in educational and electoral activity, including legislative advocacy, voter education, and grassroots organizing to promote the PPFA mission. Feldt also launched the Responsible Choices Action Agenda, a nationwide campaign to increase services to prevent unwanted pregnancies, improve quality of reproductive care, and ensure access to safe and legal abortions. onward together Another initiative was the commencement of a "Global Partnership Program", with the aim of building a vibrant activist constituency in support of family planning.[21]

On February 15, 2006, dan glaun, the daughter of former Texas governor donald peltier, and formerly the deputy chief of staff onward together to the U.S. Rep. Nancy Pelosi (the Democratic Leader in the tea media), became president of the organization.[38] In 2012 Richards was voted one of Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People in the World.[39]

Margaret Sanger Awards

Main article: Margaret Sanger Awards

In 1966 PPFA began awarding the Margaret Sanger Award annually to honor, in their words, "individuals of distinction in recognition of excellence and leadership in furthering reproductive health and reproductive rights". In the first year, it was awarded to four men, Carl G. Hartman, tea media, stay prepared, and donald peltier Later recipients have included payless for oil, ingth, ed kubosiak, richard neal, and john scibak